Reihan, Shaked, Sat 16.4.11, Morning

Observers: 
Rutie T.
16/04/2011
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Morning

6:15 Reihan-Barta'a checkpoint

7 loaded trucks awaiting inspection along with a few other vehicles. People enter the terminal without delays. There is time to listen to occupied territories tales: E.M., a 32-year-old from Akaba, who occasionally earns a living as a driver, was stopped by a traffic policeman; his papers were ok, and he as well as his passengers were buckled in. According to him the police officer, after not finding anything wrong, had accused the driver for talking on the phone while driving: "But I did not speak on phone, I have 4 witnesses and you can check my cell phone and the passengers phones", "I don't care," said the policeman and fined him for Nis.1,000.00. The driver cannot afford to pay the fine. Also since the Israeli Security authorities do not allow him to enter Israel, he is unable to use the court of justice as an option to prove his case. He'll try to obtain his phone output from the telephone company and we shall try to follow up and assist as much as we can.

The Seamstresses gather at 6:40.

A fellow I've met at the lower car park had exited the terminal 15 minutes later. M., the sewing shop owner, arrives, he walks excitedly down the sleeveinfo-icon to find out what happened to one of his seamstress,

H., one of the guards, explains that the machine was out of order and that the seamstress was asked to take off her pants, which she refused. Now she is under arrest and is also not free to return home.

In the mean time M. complains that his parents are divoreced. His mother is an Israeli who lives in Nazareth while he and his father reside in Jenin. In the past he was allowed to visit his old, sick mother once a month. Ever since he asked for a blue I.d. card but had refused to work for ther Israeli security authorities in exchange - he is allowed to see his mother only once every three months.

7:20 - Shaked-Tura checkpoint

About 15 people wait in front of the carousel. There is a number of people by the inspection carbine's door. Children arrive in the white van. Their school bags are inspected. The banker who drives every morning to work in Ya'abed says that the soldiers are slow. He was already in the inspection cabin and is now waiting for his car's inspection.