Qalandiya

Observers: 
Hanna Barag (reporting) and 10 British research students; Translator: Judith Green
Apr-16-2018
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Morning

04:15

​  Already on the way to the checkpoint, we met some pedestrians​  on their way to the industrial park of Atarot.​

​The road from highway #443 up to the checkpoint area was totally dark​ and the pedestrians were quite invisible - quite dangerous for both the pedestrians and the drivers.  Apparently, they intend to widen the road (another indication that the occupation is here "to stay"), which meanwhile makes the driving even more difficult.

Even at this early hour, the place was full of people and the line was proceeding slowly, but without trouble.  At about 05:00 there was a long line up to the entrance to the shed.  The "cages" were full and crowded.  The students, for whom this was all new and unknown, were horrified and speechless.  Indeed - what can you say which hasn't already been said about this disgrace.  The Ecumenicals were also there and mainly stood with us and listened to what was said.

I spoke with a man who knows me, because some time in the distant past I helped him.  He said that the situation at Qalandiya is desperate - the time needed to go through gets longer from day to day.  The more time that goes by, the bitterness increases and the total anger.  To the question about what will be in the future, I answered with the same question - what will be??

 

At 07:30 we all passed to the "Israeli" side and traveled back to my house.  I gave them a light breakfast and spoke with them for almost 3 hours.  It was more pleasant while sitting down, far from the rubbish and stink of what is called a toilet at Qalandiya.  Except for us, they hadn't met any other Israelis.  At their preparation meetings, they met with a representative from the Embassy.  One can guess what he reported to them.  Happily, they also asked me about the accomplishments of the State of Israel, beyond the continuation of the "enligfhtened occupation".  Because of all our bitterness and discouragement, we tend to forget that, here and there, important and significant things are done here.  Exhausted, I went to sleep!