Sansana (Meitar Crossing), South Hebron Hills

Observers: 
Daphna Y., Yehudit K. (reporting), Muhammad D.; Translator: Natanya.
01/09/2019
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Morning

We left late and the Meitar checkpoint was empty: Muhammad reports that in the  early morning, it was a usual Sunday morning, despite the Muslim New Year. Route 60 - quite lively, lots of trucks with construction materials, probably for the construction we saw, below. After the checkpoint,  the police lurk waiting for illegal workers, a game of cat and mouse. At the side of the road there is a small group of men waiting for the police to leave.

We visited the Hursa - we have already reported on the peaceful village that is all one family: The family of  Sakhtit Family with 3000 plus persons.

 As mentioned in previous reports. in the middle of the village, next to the family Divan which is a kind of banquet hall for events is, a military observation tower and two checkpoints, which close about 50 meters of the road, that were erected a year ago. The barrier prevents access to the divan and easy access for both car and pedestrian owners and basically divides the village in two. The use of the Divan depends on the DCO's approval in advance each time

We met Mr. Nasser S. who, for example, said that some time ago, a wedding in Divan was stopped in the middle by soldiers in the area, claiming there was no permit for the celebration. And we saw on a previous visit the torments of the villagers, who wanted to organize a celebration for some reason and were  refused. After contacting the DCO, the ceremony was limited to two hours. Nasser also told (and we heard from other people) about obscenities and curses from the female soldiers serving at the base. He also reported harassment of settlers from Negohot, who travel at great speed on the narrow road around the checkpoint, scaring the children on their way to school.  

He says the military often runs the "Straw Widow Procedure": a squad of soldiers invades a house for 24 hours, allegedly to make observations. Family members are imprisoned in one room or driven out of their homes during the "invasion". The soldiers leave filth behind them and sometimes there are thefts. In addition, there are nightly incursions into homes, searches and again incarceration or family deportation. Nasser says he had to take out his father, who suffers from his heart,  in the cold of winter because of one of those searches, which have no real benefit.

In short, ongoing harassment and ongoing humiliation.

Back to "Israel": Nothing new