Hizma, Jaba (Lil), Qalandiya

Observers: 
Roni Hammermann, Tamar Ivri and Tamar Fleishman; Transaltor: Tal H.
Apr-10-2016
|
Afternoon

Haven’t seen you for a long time, I said to a fellow whom I hadn’t seen for a long time.

-I was released from prison only a few days ago. I was in Ofer for two months, he said indifferently, the fellow I hadn’t seen for a long time.

He, who had already been “inside”, does not make this into a big deal. It is I who do, not letting go and asking and hearing why, and where, and how long. And he, having finished telling in detail, added resignedly: That’s what our life is like. There’s nothing to do about it.

And took his leave, continuing on his way.

Then he stopped, turned around and said: “There are many kids there. Lots and lots.”
And his face was no longer indifferent.

Again the long and winding vehicle waiting-line on the way to Jab’a tells the story of the checkpoint around the bend.

 

We’re looking for weaponssaid the soldier whose name is Noam and whose home is Tapuah settlement.

 

Well, did you find any?

-Today we’re looking for two wanted men.

How does one look for two wanted men?
- We received photos, and I remember what they look like.

 

Perhaps it occurs to the soldiers, and perhaps not, that what they are actually doing in this place, except for disrupting the lives of thousands, is to thin out vehicular traffic on Road 60 bound for Hizma Checkpoint, in order to make traffic easier for the settlers on the go.

 

 

http://www.haaretz.co.il/news/politics/.premium-1.2912229

 

-Precisely 15 minutes ago they (policemen)left here, told us an old acquaintance at Hizma village.
The police was there for some hours in the morning, left, and came back in the afternoon. Distributed tickets (violation reports) and left.

Every day, every single day the army and/or police come to the village, block access, inspect, fine people and make arrests.

-Two weeks ago six children were arrested in the village.

Perhaps six of the many many kids mentioned by the fellow I met at Qalandiya.

 

 

Haven’t seen you for a long time, I said to a fellow whom I hadn’t seen for a long time.

-I was released from prison only a few days ago. I was in Ofer for two months, he said indifferently, the fellow I hadn’t seen for a long time.

He, who had already been “inside”, does not make this into a big deal. It is I who do, not letting go and asking and hearing why, and where, and how long. And he, having finished telling in detail, added resignedly: That’s what our life is like. There’s nothing to do about it.

And took his leave, continuing on his way.

Then he stopped, turned around and said: “There are many kids there. Lots and lots.”
And his face was no longer indifferent.

Again the long and winding vehicle waiting-line on the way to Jab’a tells the story of the checkpoint around the bend.

-          We’re looking for weaponssaid the soldier whose name is Noam and whose home is Tapuach settlement.

Well, did you find any?

-Today we’re looking for two wanted men.

How does one look for two wanted men?
- We received photos, and I remember what they look like.

Perhaps it occurs to the soldiers, and perhaps not, that what they are actually doing in this place, except for disrupting the lives of thousands, is to thin out vehicular traffic on Road 60 bound for Hizma Checkpoint, in order to make traffic easier for the settlers on the go.

 

http://www.haaretz.co.il/news/politics/.premium-1.2912229

 

-Precisely 15 minutes ago they (policemen)left here, told us an old acquaintance at Hizma village.
The police was there for some hours in the morning, left, and came back in the afternoon. Distributed tickets (violation reports) and left.

Every day, every single day the army and/or police come to the village, block access, inspect, fine people and make arrests.

-Two weeks ago six children were arrested in the village.

Perhaps six of the many many kids mentioned by the fellow I met at Qalandiya.