Abu Dis, Container (Wadi Nar), Sheikh Saed, Mon 31.3.08, Morning

Observers: 
Edna P., Maya B. (reporting)
31/03/2008
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Morning
7:00 we arrive at Sheich Saed,  through Jebel Mukaber  and see from  a distance through the tons of fence and wire  that there is a large group  of men  waiting to go through the C,P.  but the line is hardly moving. 

I was not there  for two weeks , and found out now that we can hardly get  anywhere near the C.P.The  passing is a trikle,  every 7-10 minutes one person comes through.  The children  pass,  the grownups wait.  Some who came  through  told us they have been waiting for one and a half to two hours,  since there is one soldier  writing down every detail  on each person  in the line. 

Three soldiers stand on the side  talking to each other and laughing.  Nothing seems to concern   them .  The whole group is very  uncomunicative   with us.

There is a lot of tension in the air because of all this procrastination.  Suddenly  one of the man waiting must have tried to jump the line,  and since they were waiting for so long  they started hitting each other  with incredible   force,  anger and hatred ,  and for a number of seconds  the soldiers  just did not do a thing  to stop it.  I was sure they would start shooting in the air,  but they did not  instead , they detained the two men,  and stopped letting the others through for another 10 minutes .  Then  a lot of BP  jeeps arrived ,  including  a higher ranking officer,  who I tried to talk to.

 
After waiting for a while he finally deigned to talk to me,  rather listen to what I had to say. I suggested  that in the morning when men try to get to work,  an officer  or an older  commander be present  and this very tense  situation is not left to the lack of judgment of a 19 year old.  No  response.

We leave  after an hour and a half  and drive to Wadi Na'ar.  There  a  number of buses and taxies are waiting,  we speak to A. , who is always very pleasent ,  and within a few minutes all cars have left.  There  may have been some   warnings  that morning.