Hebron, Sansana, South Hebron Hills, Tarqumiya, Tue 30.10.07, Morning

Observers: 
Michal Z. Michal Ts. Hagit B.
30/10/2007
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Morning

06:30 – 11:00AM 

Sansana
We arrived at the CP at 06:40. No queue. Each worker waited not longer than 5 minutes. They complained that on their return problems occur. Yesterday they arrived at the CP at 16:30, but it was closed and they got home to Samoa only at nine o’clock in the evening. On our return, around 11:00 a.m. the CP was empty.


Tarqumia
At 09:00 a.m. we arrive at Tarqumia. There are no people waiting at the CP. A female volunteer, in uniform, welcomes us. We learned that the new CP is open, at this stage, for transferring merchandise only by the method of “back to back”. The inspections take long hours. The merchants and the lorry owners were handed out fliers, explaining them the procedures of crossing the CP.  They are required to pay income taxes there. Nor we and neither they could understand why. The buses – a bus and a minibus - to the Ktsiot prison crossed the CP at eight o’clock. There were no delays.

The last worker crossed the CP at 07:10.


Beit Yatir – Nazalin CP
A Reservist Unit mans the CP. The teachers and pupils cross without problems. More Kabate family members are allowed to pass. A new big base is in construction and all the obsolete concrete “security fences” are being stored there, an ocular reminder of the waste.

Roads 35, 60, 317, 356: Sparse traffic. Few taxis. Pillboxes manned.  Children go at the rims of the roads, which is very dangerous. The shelves at the grocery of Zif junction are empty, because it takes a long time for the groceries to cross from Tarqumia CP to Hebron and from there to Zif. The Palestinians (in the name of security) suffer, but who cares.


Hebron

Pharmacy CP: Three soldiers of the Givati Brigade let a child in a wheelchair pass and open the barbed wire from the side of the CP. But when he passes, other boys too rush and try to push through. A soldier stops two children and shouts: “Move through the CP!” He does not know Arabic and they do not understand Hebrew. We work out a compromise that one child will pass through the CP and the other one through the wicket. He soldiers are oblivious to their role as occupants. “One needs to be tough here… a friend of mine was killed at the Givat Zeev CP: They regard me as a traitor for speaking with the international volunteers. The notion that human beings are born equal and that an Arab is a human being is difficult to explain to them.

The Disputed House CP: No passers-by, when we arrived. TIPH police park nearby.

Tarpat CP: The teachers pass through the wicket according to a list that the soldiers have. There was a problem with gas containers for Tel Romeida, which were not allowed to cross the CP, because the military wanted that “their man” distribute the gas. The fact that a whole neighborhood will suffer from the lack of gas does not concern them.

Tel Romeida CP: Givati soldiers with a magnometer check each person. They check their Ids and the passports of the international volunteers too. The soldiers get stressed by the constant observation of the volunteers. “We are only doing our jobs...” they complain.

  At the entrance to the Tel-Romeida clinic: We speak with women lining up before the clinic. They complain about the restrictions on movement imposed on them. "The jewish (military) are good, but the settlers… the settlers”.

Harseena Hill CP: Surprise! The place is clean. A woman carries a babyinfo-icon in her arm, and holds by the hand a three year old kid. He cries. She cannot take a taxi. Apartheid road.