'Anabta, Ar-Ras, Jubara (Kafriat), Tue 6.11.07, Afternoon

Observers: 
Zehava G., Amit Y., Yael S. (reporting)Translation: Galia S.
Nov-6-2007
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Afternoon

Jubara, The Schoolchildren's Gate

13:50 – A thin traffic of people. They pass after a brief inspection.

Nearby a Palestinian youth is standing and waiting. It turns out that the soldiers do not allow him to enter. He tells us that he needs the signature of the head of the local council in order to get a new passage permit at the DCO [District Coordination Office of the IDF Civil Administration that handles passage permits]. We try to help him and offer to go to the head of the local council with his documents instead of him, but he refuses. We also don't understand why he needs that signature.

 

Ar-Ras

14:10 – There is no traffic whatsoever.

A lot of soldiers are here. It turns out that some of them are patrolling soldiers that have come here for lunch.

There are no restrictions and everyone passes. They are searching for a suspect born in 1982. The inspection of the vehicles is superficial, consisting of a quick glance at the back of the truck.

 

Jubara

14:30 – Twelve cars are waiting to enter Israel.

A Hummer is parked at the entrance to Avne Hefets.

 

Anabta

14:40 – The cars pass the checkpoint fast. Most of the private cars that enter Tulkarm are Israeli.

A change of shifts is taking place. A funny assault exercise is being carried out in front of us. The commander explains that the soldiers do not perform the exercise as they should.

The sock seller is happy to meet old customers.

 

15:00 – We leave for Beit Iba. Right before the junction, the taxi drivers stop us, complaining that (a minute ago) they were again told by an officer that it was forbidden to stand there. We go back to talk to the officer whose name is Avi. He claims that the taxis obstruct the view of the junction and suggests that that they stand on the other side of the checkpoint. He also says that yesterday there was some shooting and they were unable to see who was shooting. Perhaps Tami should look into the problem.

 

We leave.