Hebron, Sansana (Meitar Crossing), South Hebron Hills, Mon 24.6.13, Morning

Observers: 
Yael Agmon, Hagit Back (Reporting)
24/06/2013
|
Morning

Translator:  Charles K.

 

Sansana-Meitar crossing

06:20 Large number of laborers on the Israeli side of the crossing, waiting for transportation.  Everyone arriving on the Palestinian side crosses immediately.  Some women wait for the buses to visit relatives in prison.  We arrange to give one of the stall owners a poster with important phone numbers which he’ll display at his stall; he shows us, smiling, that he has Sylvia’s phone number on his mobile, and proudly informs us that she’s very helpful.

 

Southern Hebron Hills

Umm el Khir

After the article we saw in Ha’aretz - http://www.haaretz.co.il/news/politics/.premium-1.2053049  , headed “The Civil Admistration confiscated a handicapped rest room in the Southern Hebron Hills” – we visited the location.  We learned that yesterday the residents again received demolition orders for all the structures.  The occupation rolls on.  Remember, the residents of Umm el Khir were there before the settlement of Carmel and they’re located between the poultry coops and the homes.

Highway 356

Our brave soldiers descended from the pillbox to set up a flying checkpoint, but since there’s almost no traffic they stood calmly with drawn weapons.

 

Hebron

Construction continues on the settlers’ road through the Dana family’s land in the Wadi el Hussein neighborhood, right below Kiryat Arba.  The road was “legitimized” by the court which approved expropriating the line for security reasons.

At Giv’at Gal, Musa Tamimi tells us about an incident with a donkey.  Thursday he saw four settlers stealing his white donkey.  He ran immediately to the checkpoint to ask a soldier to arrest them.  Instead the soldier called the police, they arrived with additional soldiers and on the basis of the video filmed at the checkpoint identified the settlers and returned Musa’s donkey ten hours later.  Nothing happened to the thieving settlers.

“The occupation routine,” as we’ve often said.