Hebron, South Hebron Hills, Mon 11.2.13, Morning

Observers: 
Noa and Hagit (Reporting)
11/02/2013
|
Morning

 

Translator:  Charles K.

 

08:30 – 11:30

 

Meitar crossing

Infrastructure work at the merchandise crossing proceeds apace.  On our way back, M., our faithful driver, shows us how bus number 28 of the Metropolitan company coming from the settlements, on which Arabsinfo-icon are allowed to ride, is inspected very suspiciously, while the buses of the Southern Hebron Hills regional council aren’t inspected at all.  The settlers are above it all.

 

We see military vehicles on Highway 317 guarding the Carmel and Ma’on settlements.  From whom?  No one protects the Palestinian localities there from repeated harassment by the settlers.

 

All along the road we see the red signs that have been planted to warn against entering Palestinian territory.

 

We drove into Beni Na’im to see the vineyard belonging to Menachem Livni, the Jewish terrorist (who had been sentenced to life in prison for his part in the Jewish underground).  He gets a military escort whenever he feels like going to the vineyard.  That’s how they waste good people on days of reserve duty.  The red signs there were erected on the other side of his vineyard.  Thus the army helps settlers – and, in this case, the terrorist – to take over Palestinian lands.

 

Hebron

The barrier next to Beit HaMeriva isn’t locked, the soldiers seated on the roof allow the Palestinian driver to open the checkpoint himself, the factory has a permit.  The soldiers are too lazy to come down.

 

A bus carrying soldiers on a tour drives along the worshippers’ route; locals watch apprehensively.

 

At the entrance to the Cave of the Patriarchs they again speak to our driver in a racist manner:  “You’re not Jewish; you’re not allowed in.”  When I say to the soldier, “Do you realize what you asked?!” he calls his colleague who explains that he’s allowed to enter the parking lot, but not to pray.  I remind him of Beitar Yerushalyim; the soldier blushes.  They simply don’t understand what they’re saying; it’s really a shame.

 

Otherwise – the occupation routine.