Bethlehem, Etzion DCL, Nabi Yunis, Wed 17.6.09, Morning

Observers: 
Rachel M., Drora P. (reporting)
Jun-17-2009
|
Morning

 

 

06:50 AM, bethlehem - Rachel passage: at 06:50 the line is nearly finished. We met the ecumenical and according to her until 06:30 1600 persons passed the checkpoint. The difference between one day and the other she ascribes to the officer who is present at the site and through his efforts. As to the women – the humanitarian window works well and in mutual respect, but the moment they enter the room for the examination for metal the people mix. The women complain of sexual harassment. This room is hidden from our inspection and it is important to that we be able to have influence there too.

Etzion DCL: 2 persons approached us because they are prevented by the security service. Both have an invitation to work from an employer in Israel; we directed them to the usual routine and we hope for the best.

Nabi Yunes: a Palestinian asks for help to get invoices in order to pay police fines. From the Etzion DCL he was sent to Hebron DCO and there nobody was present. We asked him to bring the original ticket next time and meet with one of us.

Ein Aruv: we went to the grocer shop. The owner complained that a few weeks before soldiers broke into his house and behaved brutally. He does not know what to do and asks for an address where he can complain about what happened.

A group of houses between Alon Shevuth and Etzion DCL: the situation there is dismal and represents the ugliness of the occupation. The owners have a green ID card but the area is annexed to Israel and they remain without any rights. No health care and no work permits. The young men don’t work and there are many mouths to feed. A large part of there fields is ‘taken’ by the kibbutz whose groves surround their homes. One of the daughters of the village gave birth to two deaf children. Because of their legal status they cannot consult doctors and our Israeli organizations. I will try to investigate this through Doctors without borders (probably Physicians for Human Rights) and if any of you has any further suggestions they will be willingly accepted.